Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump”

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Assassin’s Gaze

Lightman says “There is no such thing as an assassin’s gaze.” I have been doing research to determine if there is such an expression – not just a gaze – that appears before a premeditated physical assault. I am close to an answer, but the research is not yet finished, so Lightman is right – we don’t yet know if there is an expression that might warn of an impending assassination attempt.

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Saying First and Last Names

Foster comments on the governor separating the first and last name of the victim, Michelle. My hunch is that the governor responded to Lightman’s question about the name of the victim with just her first name, because he is closely associated with her, and then noticing that he might be revealing that closeness added the last name to make his knowledge of her seem less personal.

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Famous Lip Presses

The governor’s lip-press when Lightman accuses him of having sex with Michelle, and the lip presses shown by Spitzer, Clinton and other celebrities (but not by Edwards), only mean that the person is feeling the need to control what is felt or said. It doesn’t tell us more than that.

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Flared Nostrils

Torres says that what Corey did with his nostrils shows her he wanted the governor dead. As best I can see he didn’t do much with his nostrils, and if he did it would not prove what Torres claims. Nostril dilation or nostril elongation movements can occur with anger or anguish.

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Not Surprised

Torres says Corey’s facial expression shows that he is surprised, so the weapon isn’t his. But the expression doesn’t actually show surprise – the eyes don’t widen, the jaw isn’t dropped open, and only one eyebrow is raised.

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Absence of Emotion

The absence of emotion in Michelle’s story about hitting and killing a man convinces Foster she didn’t do it. The absence of emotion is important only when you are certain this is a person, who like most people, does show her emotions. In a famous Australian case, a mother was convicted because she didn’t show any emotion when talking about her missing child. Eventually she was freed when the child’s bones were found in a wild dog’s lair. Meryl Streep played that emotionless mother in “Cry in the Dark.”

Season 2, Episode 17 “Bullet Bump” – Emotional Wildfire

Loker tells Lightman that he has an emotional wildfire where Emily is concerned. This is a concept I introduced when emotions are aroused so strongly that the person is unable to control his or her actions.